Category: Books-Arts and Entertainment

How to Change Your Mind

What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence by Michael Pollan

This book explains the mind better than most. The spiritual event can be created with manipulating the brain with chemicals. Each individual has a perception of reality and forms shortcuts to evaluate experiences so the body can survive and comprehend the information the senses are providing. Drugs fog the learned shortcuts and open the mind to more imagination that seems so real.

We have much to learn about the brain and its functions. Let the scientists do the testing and leave the Tim Leary’s to manipulating politics.

Politics, Religion, Intelligence

Life is not easy and requires sifting through lots of information and experience which is filtered through our perceptions. Then we have self generated feelings, emotions, senses, memory, unconscious, imagination, unknowns, etc. Much of the brain’s activity is formed by neuron connections formed by habits.

We view the world in these individual ways as the genetic code makes our unique combination of brain chemicals the skew brain operations. Life is only as we know it and practice behavior that encourages good subjective feelings.

On the other side we have reality that is cause and effect of some factors we are aware of and many factors that are unknown. Nature that uses laws both know and unknown to produce cause and effect does not have the human qualities each of us is endowed with. This means most all the perceptions of fairness, morality, equality, etc. are human constructs. Human constructs form both politics and religion. Some human constructs define intelligence.

Intelligence allows us to have better probability to affect things that happen. Keep all this in mind the next time you take an action of any kind including eating, voting, working, consuming, thinking, believing, and any other human activity that continues humanity.

Sapiosexual

Would the genetics be passed on to the children?
Similarities in brain activity could be used to predict friendships
Results are evidence that people tend to befriend people who think in a similar way, scientists say
“Our results suggest that friends process the world around them in exceptionally similar ways.”

The scientists said their research is consistent with the concept of “neural homophily” – the idea that people tend to be friends with individuals who see the world in a similar way.

“The notion that people tend to resemble their friends is an enduring intuition, as evidenced by the centuries-old adage, ‘birds of a feather flock together’,” they wrote in the paper documenting their study, which was published in the journal Nature Communications.

CRISPR

CRISPR can be described as a pair of designer molecular scissors because of its core function: to home in on specific 20 letter DNA sequences and cut apart both strands of the double helix. This function allows gene-editing so the scientists can do repair and changes in the genes which are the maps for the cells that make life.

This opens the door to many questions about ethics, morals, religion, laws and many other areas for example designer humans or the perhaps the end of death. Our society is wasting its time on emotional candy as we have a a responsibility to control the course of humanity. Why is the media spending time on people’s sex lives when the whole future is depended on the citizens understanding science and the few using it to meet their idea of what the future should be?

“A Crack in Creation” by Jennifer A. Doudna

Holoplayer

Holoplayer

Good bye VR head sets.

Inequality, Fair and Reasonable

“In a paper published in April in the journal Nature Human Behaviour called ‘Why people prefer unequal societies’, a team of researchers from Yale University argue that humans – even as young children and babies – actually prefer living in a world in which inequality exists. It sounds counter-intuitive, so why would that be? Because if people find themselves in a situation where everyone is equal, studies suggest that many become angry or bitter if people who work hard aren’t rewarded, or if slackers are over-rewarded.
For example, in one study, a group of six- to eight-year-olds was tasked with divvying up erasers among two boys who cleaned a room as rewards. Researchers found that, if they told the group of children that both boys did a good job, and then gave the group an odd number of erasers, the kids made the unanimous decision to throw away the extra eraser rather than give it to one of the boys as an unfair bonus.
And yet? When the researchers told the kids that one boy worked harder than the other, the group awarded the extra prize to the harder worker.
“We argue that the public perception of wealth inequality itself being aversive to most people is incorrect, and that instead, what people are truly concerned about is unfairness,” says Christina Starmans, a psychology post-doc at Yale who worked on the paper.”

John Galt Speaks

” You have cried that man’s sins are destroying the world and you have cursed human nature for the unwillingness to practice the virtues you have demanded .Since virtue, to you, consists of sacrifice, you have demanded more sacrifices at every successive disaster. In the name of a return to morality, you have sacrificed all those evils which you held as the course of you plight. You sacrificed justice to mercy. You have sacrificed independence to unity. You have sacrificed reason to faith. You have sacrificed wealth to need. You have sacrificed self-esteem to self-denial, You have sacrificed happiness to duty.”

Atlas Shrugged

Perhaps we need more debate about lifestyles.

“Steve Jobs” by Walter Isaacson

Jobs, who was a college dropout, told the Stanford graduates:

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. … Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice.

“When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog … It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand …

“Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: ‘Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.’ … And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.”

Steve Jobs was not in it for the money; he wanted to change the world. He had very good and very bad points but they were his and not of a person trained for a job. Steve had gifts of sizing up people and calling a spade a spade. He did not worry about criticizing but also could be very charming and inspirational when it was called for. He bullied people that did not stand up to him and only wanted “A” grade people around him as he did not have the patients to deal with second best.  Some would call that discrimination.

“Steve Jobs” by Walter Isaacson

A good read by an excellent writer, a book that is a must the young.

How Social Networks Drive Black Unemployment

Favoritism and social connections among whites, not just racial discrimination, hurt blacks in the job market.

I am reading Steve Jobs biography and one thing is very apparent that people choose different cultures and their friends and associates from those cultures. Steve dropped out of college and experimented with LSD he also traveled to India to find a spiritual leader. A little later in life he was a rebel and as he started Apple Corporation he hired what he called pirates as he did not even wear shoes at work. One interview with a white qualified candidate that was in a suit and tie he could sense the team misfit so he asked how many virgins did he screw and how many times did he take LSD.

Is this discrimination? Yes, in a sort but not race discrimination.  Many jobs are filled because of friends recommending people they know that fit the culture of the work place. The “A” team is one with the highly qualified that works well together and many times also play together.  Being qualified and having a degree in this day in age is not good enough you have to have connections and develop relationships with people in your field of interests.  Professional groups are the first place to start to learn the cultures and connections in the field you are inspired in.

Out side of the box thinking

A rallying cry for revolutionizing democracy in the digital age, Citizenville
reveals how ordinary Americans can reshape their government for the better.
Gavin Newsom, the lieutenant governor of California, argues that today’s
government is stuck in the last century while—in both the private sector and our
personal lives—absolutely everything else has changed. The explosion of social
media, the evolution of Internet commerce, the ubiquity of smart phones that can
access all the world’s information; in the face of these extraordinary advances,
our government appears increasingly irrelevant and out of touch.

Drawing on wide-ranging interviews with thinkers and politicians, Newsom’s
Citizenville shows how Americans can transform their government, taking
matters into their own hands to dissolve political gridlock even as they produce
tangible changes in the real world. When local Web designers wanted to prevent
muggings in Chicago and Oakland, they created innovative crime-mapping tools
using public police data. When congressional representatives wanted citizens’
input on new legislation, they used interactive blogging tools to invite public
comments and changes. When a town in Texas needed to drum up civic engagement,
officials invented a local digital “currency” to reward citizens for
participating in government—making small-town politics suddenly as fun and
addictive as online games such as Farmville. Surveying the countless small
advances made by ordinary Americans in reinventing government for the
twenty-first century, Newsom unveils a path for American prosperity and
democratic vitality.

Newsom explains how twenty-first-century problems
are too big and too expensive for the government simply to buy solutions;
instead, Americans must innovate their way out. Just as the post office and the
highway system provide public infrastructure to channel both personal and
private enterprise—a platform upon which citizens can grow—so too could a modern
digital government house the needs, concerns, information, and collaboration of
an enlightened digital citizenry.

A vision for better government that
truly achieves the ancient goal of commonwealth and a triumphant call for
individuals to reinvigorate the country with their own two hands,
Citizenville is a timely road map for restoring American prosperity and
for reinventing citizenship in today’s networked age.

 

“Citizenville: How to Take the Town Square Digital and Reinvent Government”

Gavin Newsom

(Author), Lisa Dickey (Author)

Dansette