School Busing

Mandatory school busing for racial integration was one of the more controversial policies in American public education. Although busing was necessary for dismantling dual school systems in the south, this unpopular policy drove many middle class and white families away from city school systems, thereby contributing to greater segregation between city and suburban school districts. Were the costs both human and economic worth it and justified?
There is a relatively common finding that African American student achievement is enhanced by less segregated schooling…. the earliest studies tend to focus on the effects of court ordered desegregation, and therefore, to combine the impacts of racial composition per se with various policy actions.

The community and children lose when they have to spend time being transported. Countless hours on buses by children rob them of other beneficial experiences they can have walking to school. Behavior problems on buses create a negative start of the school day. Cultural differences take teacher time away from learning. Children are forced to leave school at the same time not allowing after school help and tutoring. Parents are taken away from neighborhood relations with other parents. The social structure collapses and isolates members of the community. Different learning styles and levels are mashed together to benefit no one.

All for some utopian idea that everyone has and equal I.Q. and abilities? What can be done to improve public education for all children and what can be done to prevent children being born into poverty to parents that do not have parenting skills?

Can the U.S. afford to pay huge sums to drivers, corporations, to fleet a pollution causing transportation that has never been proven to improve education?

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Dansette